Dogs Trust Launches Greyhound Awareness Week

UK – Dogs Trust Manchester is holding a Greyhound Awareness Week (Monday 13 April – Sunday 19 April) to bust some myths about the breed, and help the five Greyhounds currently at the centre find their forever homes.

Contrary to what people tend to think, Greyhounds are often couch potatoes and need little exercise, liking nothing more than cosying up on a comfy bed in a warm home.

Whilst there are some basic rehoming requirements, they are standards rather of blanket policies. We try to be flexible to match the requirements of the individual pet dog and the viability of our home provided. Each pet dog will definitely have its own specific demands for a new home and this will certainly be detailed in their rehoming information. Clicking on the following link will get you more information on Hungarian Vizsla

Since opening last October, Dogs Trust Manchester has looked after 22 Greyhounds, the majority of whom have been ex-racers, including three that arrived last week joining two others already at the centre waiting for their perfect families.

A few facts about Greyhounds

The Greyhound originated in Great Britain and is one of the oldest dog breeds in existence.

It is the only recognised dog breed mentioned in the Bible.

They are believed to be the fastest breed of dog on the planet – they can reach up to 45miles/hour over a short distance!

In the Middle Ages, only noblemen were allowed to own and hunt with a Greyhound and any harm done to a Greyhound was punishable by death.

Henry VIII and Queen Victoria were both proud owners of Greyhounds.

Greyhounds don’t like sitting down, and some can’t, due to the muscle arrangement in the body.

Dawn Bishop, Dogs Trust Manchester’s Rehoming Centre Manager, said: “Sadly many retired racers end up in rescue centres like ours waiting for a loving home to spend the rest of their lives in, but because people associate them with racing, they assume they are a dog that needs lots of exercise. That’s not the case. They are definitely strong and fast but they are surprisingly lazy and very loyal, which is why they make great pets.”

Throughout the special week, visitors to the centre in Denton will be able to find out everything they need to know about Greyhounds and of course meet the dogs looking for their forever family, including four-year-old Sam. Sam is a toy and food-loving dog who is looking for an adult only home where he is the only dog.

Dawn says: “We have nicknamed him Smiley Sam as he really does have a great smile. He enjoys chasing a ball but generally just loves to be around people. He is really chilled in his kennel and can often be found snuggled up on his blankets, so we really hope he catches someone’s eye during our special week and finds the home he deserves.”

ThePetSite News Desk

http://www.thepetsite.co.uk/news/14361/dogs-trust-launches-greyhound-awareness-week

RSPCA Cymru tasked to review responsible dog ownership for Welsh Government

Deputy Minister for Farming and Food, Rebecca Evans has asked RSPCA Cymru to undertake an independent review of responsible dog ownership in Wales.

The announcement follows on from a statement the Deputy Minister made last month launching a consultation on proposals to introduce compulsory microchipping in Wales from next Spring.

Whilst there are some fundamental rehoming criteria, they are guidelines rather of blanket policies. We try to be flexible to match the requirements of the individual canine and the suitability of our home offered. Each canine will definitely have its own particular demands for a new home and this will be detailed in their rehoming information. Click the following link for more information on Nervous Dog

The review, which is expected to report in early autumn, will also involve the Dogs Trust in Wales and other interested parties such as, Local Authorities, schools and vets.

It is expected to make recommendations about what can be done to raise awareness of the responsibilities of owning a dog particularly in areas with higher numbers of dog attacks and will be based on sound evidence and use the most up-to-date information.

The Deputy Minister said, “I am pleased that RSPCA Cymru has agreed to carry out this review for us. As set out in our Animal Health and Welfare Framework, the way we treat our animals is an important reflection of our society’s values. I am particularly looking forward to reading the report’s recommendations on how we can raise awareness of responsible dog ownership among children and young people as they have a long term role to play in driving up animal welfare standards.

“Commissioning this review is further evidence of the Welsh Government’s commitment to improving dog welfare in Wales. In 2010, we legislated to ban electronic shock collars and from 30 April 2015 new standards will be introduced for licensed dog breeders. We are currently consulting on plans to introduce legislation requiring the compulsory microchipping of dogs in Wales by next Spring.”

RSPCA Cymru’s Head of External Affairs, Claire Lawson, said, “We welcome this opportunity to undertake an independent review of responsible dog ownership in Wales.

“The welfare of dogs and community safety issues are integral to resolving irresponsible dog ownership.

“This review will provide an important opportunity to build on the strong record we have in Wales in regards to enhancing dog welfare.”

The work will also advise on existing legislation for the control of dogs, including the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act, and examine if it meets its objective to raise standards of dog ownership.

http://news.rspca.org.uk/2015/04/09/rspca-cymru-tasked-to-review-responsible-dog-ownership-for-welsh-government/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=rspca-cymru-tasked-to-review-responsible-dog-ownership-for-welsh-government

Extremely sick Bernard now a star following rehoming success #HomesForHorses

POOR Bernard was extremely ill when he was found.

He was emaciated, infected with salmonella and was even too exhausted to stand. The RSPCA rescued him in Gwent along with four other horses around three years ago.

Bernard beforeBernard was so weak he used the walls and doors to lean on and required assistance to get himself up after laying down as he was just not strong enough.

He was very underweight, his back was covered in rain scald sores and he was full of worms and suffering from salmonella.

Bernard’s recovery wasn’t easy and he endured a difficult six months of intensive care.

Thanks to dedicated care Bernard slowly grew from strength to strength and was adopted by his carer.

Whilst there are some essential rehoming criteria, they are standards instead of blanket policies. We try to be functional to match the needs of the individual pet dog and the suitability of your home provided. Each dog will certainly have its own particular requirements for a new house and this will be detailed in their rehoming details. Click the following link for more information on Vizsla Rescue

The five-year-old 15 hand lightweight cob, is now proving to be quite the success on the show jumping circuit.

“Considering everything he went through he was one lucky horse. He really enjoys the competitions and he gets placed every time we take him out,” said his new owner from Swansea.

“Bernard is off to the British Riding Club’s winter novice show jumping Championships in Hartpury this weekend, he qualified last November so we are keeping our fingers crossed. Bernard after 2

“He also qualified for Festival of the Horse last weekend which is great.

“Bernard has a cheeky character, loves people and has a twinkle in his eye that everyone falls for.”

RSPCA inspector Nicola Johnson said she will always remember the day she rescued Bernard.

“Bernard just came up to me and put his head on my shoulder,” she said. “He was just beautiful and it is lovely to see the amount of joy he is bringing to his new owners.

“It just shows every horse should be able to fulfil its potential. This is how animals should be looked after.”

RSPCA equine rehoming officer for Wales Gareth Johnson said: “Bernard is very special, and the RSPCA have many more horses waiting for your special home. Rescue horses make good companions and there are a variety of rescue horses available for rehoming.

“We have launched a Homes for Horses appeal which we hope will help us rehome many of our horses, ponies and donkeys. We have had a good response from Wales’ horse and pony owners in the past – and we continue to invite people – who have the means to – to rehome a horse from us.”

To apply to adopt a horse, pony or donkey please visit www.rspca.org.uk/homesforhorses.

There will horse rehoming open days at Gonsal Farm Equine Welfare and Rehabilitation Centre, Dorrington, Shrewsbury, between Friday 3 April and Monday 6 April from 11am to 3pm each day. You can just turn up or you can book an appointment by calling 07720 948 636.

Text HORSE to 70111 TO GIVE £3. Texts cost £3 + your standard network rate. RSPCA will receive 100% of your donation, excluding 02 customers, where £2.96 will be received. By using this service, you agree that we may contact you in the future, if you’d rather we didn’t text OPTOUT to 70030. To discuss this donation, please call 0300 123 0346.

http://news.rspca.org.uk/2015/04/02/extremely-sick-bernard-now-a-star-following-rehoming-success-homesforhorses/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=extremely-sick-bernard-now-a-star-following-rehoming-success-homesforhorses

Miss P: best in show at Westminster Kennel Club – and a total diva

Miss P meets the press shortly after winning best in show at the 139th Westminster Kennel Club dog show on Tuesday at Madison Square Garden. Photograph: Timothy A Clary/AFP/Getty Images

A 15in beagle named Miss P is the toast of New York after being named best in show at the Westminster Kennel Club dog show on Tuesday.

Here’s everything you need to know about America’s new top dog.

The win was rare

Only once in 138 previous years had a beagle won best in show at Westminster, when the hugely popular Uno captured the top honor in 2008. The two are in fact related: Miss P is Uno’s grand-neice, though they’ve never met.

The competition was fierce

Miss P had scored a minor upset over Nathan the bloodhound on Monday to win the hound group and advance to Tuesday’s final round. The seven-dog lineup for the competition’s top prize was stacked, with more than 500 career best in shows represented (and Miss P accounting for only 19 of them).

Related: Behind the scenes at the Westminster dog show – in pictures

Frontrunners included crowd favorite Swagger, an old English sheepdog who had won reserve best in show in 2013, and Matisse, a Portuguese water dog (and cousin of Sunny Obama) who is the most successful male show-dog in history with 238 best in shows under his belt. Also in the hunt was Rocket, a shih tzu co-owned by famed heiress Patty Hearst.

She’s officially retired

William Alexander, Miss P’s handler, said the three-year-old had already been scheduled to retire after this competition regardless of the outcome. After beating out nearly 2,800 competitors in 192 breeds and varieties, the move into motherhood will be that much sweeter.

She’s Canadian

Miss P – short for Peyton – is co-owned by the mother-and-daughter team of Lori and Kaitlyn Crandlemire from Enderby, British Columbia, though she’s spent most of her life with Alexander in Milton, Ontario. A third co-owner, the American breeder Eddie Dziuk, was also co-owner of Uno.

She’s booked solid the next few days

Miss P’s whirlwind media tour on Wednesday includes a 6.30am appearance on Fox Friends, 7.30am on the Today show, 9am on Good Day New York, 11am on The View, a photo-op atop the Empire State Building, then lunch at Sardi’s in midtown Manhattan where she will be served steak on a silver platter – an annual post-Westminster tradition. Appearances on Shepard Smith and Keith Olbermann will follow, before she caps the night with a walk-on role in Kinky Boots.

She’s a diva

When asked to expound on what makes Miss P unique, Alexander was quick to respond.

“She is a princess,” the 49-year-old handler said. “It’s all about her. She’s so demanding. She thinks she’s the biggest dog in the dog show. I’ve shown her before where she gets so mad at the dog she’s behind that she grumbles and marches around. She wants to be the one.”

For one night, that’s exactly what she was.

http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2015/feb/18/westminster-kennel-club-dog-show-miss-p

Why a chicken might be the perfect pet for you

There are more than 150 different breeds of chicken in existence, all of varying plumage, size and temperament. Andy Cawthray, the author of a number of books on poultry, advises doing your research first. “If you are looking specifically for pets, then focusing on the breeds with docile temperaments is perhaps the best route. If space is limited or young children are involved, then a bantam breed like the Pekin can make a good starter. If you have more room and older children, then it’s hard to beat the Brahma for appeal, entertainment and temperament. However, the more docile breeds are often not usually high egg producers.”

For the feel-good factor, Charlotte says it’s worth considering a bird that’s spent the first part of its life indoors. “Not only are ex-caged hens cheap, but it’s such a rewarding feeling to know you have rescued them from a horrible experience and it’s a great opportunity to watch them thrive. Ex-caged hens are often featherless and suffering from muscle damage, but after a few weeks the chickens will be nearly feathered and running up and down the garden.”

Five-year-old Daisy cuddles up to her new feathered friend (Jay Williams)

In the end we decided to go to a local breeder. We selected two Cuckoo Marans, known for their friendly temperament and high egg production, and two Light Sussex, said to be excellent layers but also meaty table birds (just in case we changed our minds and went for the casserole option).

Something about bringing them home reminded me of the times we’d brought each of our babies home from hospital. We tucked them safely into the back of the car, only in cardboard boxes rather than Maxi-Cosi contraptions, and set off on a new chapter in our lives, approaching the speed bumps with the kind of trepidation usually reserved for transporting newborns.

At home, we prised the birds from the box, still not quite sure how to handle them, before leaving them to explore their hopefully fox-proof new surroundings.

Shortly afterwards, I heard screaming from the garden: “Mummeeeee!”

Heart racing, I pegged it outside to fight off whatever predator was savaging our new flock. The kids were crowded around the coop.

“What’s happened?” I asked, warily.

“It’s done an egg!” squealed Daisy, five, revealing untold excitement and a slight blurring of bodily functions.

“Laid an egg,” I corrected, peering in to verify this everyday marvel.

It doesn’t matter how long you’ve known where eggs come from, there’s still something disproportionately pleasing about seeing it for yourself.

One minute this ball of feathers was scratching in the dirt, the next it had conjured up an egg. Just like that. Just like the ones they sold in shops. Not even bloody, or dirty.

Such was the novelty of eating the eggs that magically appeared within a few metres of the back door that we ended up getting three more birds to keep up with the exponential increase in omelette consumption that followed.

Henrietta, Olga, Wilma and Emerald were joined by a pair of Blue Marans, jointly named as The Blues, and another hen of unknown breed, which the kids named Goldie, on account of the medallion marking around her neck. Collectively, they were all just The Girls.

The Blues turned out to be blighters and were constantly escaping from God knows where until we ended up replacing half the garden fence — far outweighing the value of any eggs they were likely to produce over a lifetime.

Yet I couldn’t help feeling slightly in awe of these birds that effectively gave birth every day, without so much as a whiff of gas and air, let alone an epidural. I’m no geometrist, but the size of an egg relative to the stuffing end of a roast chicken seems roughly analogous to the size of a baby and a birth canal. And being 10cm dilated is not an experience I’d like to repeat on a daily basis.

But as we soon discovered, chickens are more than just egg machines. After a couple of weeks they’d run to greet us, eat out of our hands and even allow the children to pick them up, proving themselves to be a match for any dog or cat, minus the hassle.

Andy Cawthray agrees. He says: “They are a wonderfully accessible form of livestock. Not only are they capable of providing food for the kitchen, they are also tremendously engaging characters with very identifiable personalities. They interact with you as the keeper just as well, if not better, than many of the more commonly encountered pets.”

A few months on and I’m turning into a chicken evangelist. The Girls are completely undemanding, but always delighted to see us, requiring only clean bedding, food and water. In essence: the perfect pet. They even put themselves to bed at night, which is more than can be said of the kids.

I’m not sure what will happen when egg production tails off in old age. Now that the chickens have ingratiated themselves into family life, casserole is no longer an option. I guess that means we’ll be providing a bunch of menopausal chickens with free BB in years to come. It would be rude not to.

Know your chickens

Chickens are sociable animals and like to be part of a flock, so should be kept in groups of at least three.

Chickens are omnivorous. However, it is illegal to feed them kitchen food waste due to the risk of disease.

Avoid washing the eggs as the shell is porous, so pathogens can travel through, presenting a possible health risk.

Leaving a radio on during the day where chickens are free-ranging is said to help deter foxes.

Eggshell colour is related to the colour of the hen’s earlobes – the darker the lobe, the darker the egg

http://telegraph.feedsportal.com/c/32726/f/646284/s/43a0ccf9/sc/10/l/0L0Stelegraph0O0Clifestyle0Cpets0C114223130CWhy0Ea0Echicken0Emight0Ebe0Ethe0Eperfect0Epet0Efor0Eyou0Bhtml/story01.htm

Why a chicken might be the perfect pet for you

There are more than 150 different breeds of chicken in existence, all of varying plumage, size and temperament. Andy Cawthray, the author of a number of books on poultry, advises doing your research first. “If you are looking specifically for pets, then focusing on the breeds with docile temperaments is perhaps the best route. If space is limited or young children are involved, then a bantam breed like the Pekin can make a good starter. If you have more room and older children, then it’s hard to beat the Brahma for appeal, entertainment and temperament. However, the more docile breeds are often not usually high egg producers.”

For the feel-good factor, Charlotte says it’s worth considering a bird that’s spent the first part of its life indoors. “Not only are ex-caged hens cheap, but it’s such a rewarding feeling to know you have rescued them from a horrible experience and it’s a great opportunity to watch them thrive. Ex-caged hens are often featherless and suffering from muscle damage, but after a few weeks the chickens will be nearly feathered and running up and down the garden.”

Five-year-old Daisy cuddles up to her new feathered friend (Jay Williams)

In the end we decided to go to a local breeder. We selected two Cuckoo Marans, known for their friendly temperament and high egg production, and two Light Sussex, said to be excellent layers but also meaty table birds (just in case we changed our minds and went for the casserole option).

Something about bringing them home reminded me of the times we’d brought each of our babies home from hospital. We tucked them safely into the back of the car, only in cardboard boxes rather than Maxi-Cosi contraptions, and set off on a new chapter in our lives, approaching the speed bumps with the kind of trepidation usually reserved for transporting newborns.

At home, we prised the birds from the box, still not quite sure how to handle them, before leaving them to explore their hopefully fox-proof new surroundings.

Shortly afterwards, I heard screaming from the garden: “Mummeeeee!”

Heart racing, I pegged it outside to fight off whatever predator was savaging our new flock. The kids were crowded around the coop.

“What’s happened?” I asked, warily.

“It’s done an egg!” squealed Daisy, five, revealing untold excitement and a slight blurring of bodily functions.

“Laid an egg,” I corrected, peering in to verify this everyday marvel.

It doesn’t matter how long you’ve known where eggs come from, there’s still something disproportionately pleasing about seeing it for yourself.

One minute this ball of feathers was scratching in the dirt, the next it had conjured up an egg. Just like that. Just like the ones they sold in shops. Not even bloody, or dirty.

Such was the novelty of eating the eggs that magically appeared within a few metres of the back door that we ended up getting three more birds to keep up with the exponential increase in omelette consumption that followed.

Henrietta, Olga, Wilma and Emerald were joined by a pair of Blue Marans, jointly named as The Blues, and another hen of unknown breed, which the kids named Goldie, on account of the medallion marking around her neck. Collectively, they were all just The Girls.

The Blues turned out to be blighters and were constantly escaping from God knows where until we ended up replacing half the garden fence — far outweighing the value of any eggs they were likely to produce over a lifetime.

Yet I couldn’t help feeling slightly in awe of these birds that effectively gave birth every day, without so much as a whiff of gas and air, let alone an epidural. I’m no geometrist, but the size of an egg relative to the stuffing end of a roast chicken seems roughly analogous to the size of a baby and a birth canal. And being 10cm dilated is not an experience I’d like to repeat on a daily basis.

But as we soon discovered, chickens are more than just egg machines. After a couple of weeks they’d run to greet us, eat out of our hands and even allow the children to pick them up, proving themselves to be a match for any dog or cat, minus the hassle.

Andy Cawthray agrees. He says: “They are a wonderfully accessible form of livestock. Not only are they capable of providing food for the kitchen, they are also tremendously engaging characters with very identifiable personalities. They interact with you as the keeper just as well, if not better, than many of the more commonly encountered pets.”

A few months on and I’m turning into a chicken evangelist. The Girls are completely undemanding, but always delighted to see us, requiring only clean bedding, food and water. In essence: the perfect pet. They even put themselves to bed at night, which is more than can be said of the kids.

I’m not sure what will happen when egg production tails off in old age. Now that the chickens have ingratiated themselves into family life, casserole is no longer an option. I guess that means we’ll be providing a bunch of menopausal chickens with free BB in years to come. It would be rude not to.

Know your chickens

Chickens are sociable animals and like to be part of a flock, so should be kept in groups of at least three.

Chickens are omnivorous. However, it is illegal to feed them kitchen food waste due to the risk of disease.

Avoid washing the eggs as the shell is porous, so pathogens can travel through, presenting a possible health risk.

Leaving a radio on during the day where chickens are free-ranging is said to help deter foxes.

Eggshell colour is related to the colour of the hen’s earlobes – the darker the lobe, the darker the egg

http://telegraph.feedsportal.com/c/32726/f/646284/s/43a0ccf9/sc/10/l/0L0Stelegraph0O0Clifestyle0Cpets0C114223130CWhy0Ea0Echicken0Emight0Ebe0Ethe0Eperfect0Epet0Efor0Eyou0Bhtml/story01.htm

Relax, don’t do it: readers’ photos of chilled out pets

Our new rescue Greyhound! (I know…I know)

Greyhounds really feel the cold at night. This was his first night and his warm, fleecy indoors coat had not yet arrived in the post

Photograph: Bairdedoo/GuardianWitness

Share

Share this post

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/guardianwitness-blog/gallery/2015/feb/13/-readers-photos-of-chilled-out-pets-pictures

Pet subjects: is my dog too old for a lead?

A She can still be retrained, but you must be patient. A head halter often works better than a collar – give her treats and praise as you put it on, and take it off after a minute. Repeat this several times daily. Once she accepts it, start with 30-second walks. Dogs are never too old to learn new tricks.

Q My cat has daily drops for arthritis and needs a check-up every six months. The cost of this, along with routine care, such as flea prevention/wormers, adds up. Do you think vets’ fees discourage people from properly looking after pets?

KH, via email

A Animal medicine regulations aim to achieve a balance: ensuring that medicines are not given inappropriately while not insisting on unnecessary check-ups. If anyone has financial difficulties, it’s worth talking to your vet about budget options.

A cat-friendly cardboard box

(Make Them Roar)

Cats love cardboard boxes, and a new idea develops this theme. The cat caravan is a custom-designed cardboard playhouse to entertain indoor cats.

To support this project via a Kickstarter campaign, visit kickstarter.com/projects/catcaravan/cat-caravan

Rescue Us

Six-year-old Daisy and Muffin would like to be homed together. Contact 01825 741349 or visit cats.org.uk.

To find out the outcomes of the rescued pets featured in this column, see petsubjectsrescue.petethevet.com

Send pet problems to pete.wedderburn@telegraph.co.uk. All sick animals should, of course, be taken to a vet.

http://telegraph.feedsportal.com/c/32726/f/646284/s/43597cf5/sc/21/l/0L0Stelegraph0O0Cnews0Chealth0Cpets0Ehealth0C1140A82390CPet0Esubjects0Eis0Emy0Edog0Etoo0Eold0Efor0Ea0Elead0Bhtml/story01.htm

‘Buster saved my life every day we were together’

RAF Police Flight Sergeant Barrow, a career security forces man, is no softie. Almost 6ft tall, with rugged features and the steely core of a military professional, he has also served in Bosnia, Iraq, the Falkland Islands and Northern Ireland.

But as Buster saved him and his colleagues time and again from deadly explosives, an enduring bond developed between the pair.

Their friendship dates back to their Afghanistan tour. It was 2007 and Buster had been deployed with Flt Sgt Barrow to serve in the desert and poppy fields of Helmand and the slums of Lashkar Gah.

It was a treacherous point in the war, when roadside bombs – improvised explosive devices, or IEDS – and suicide missions were commonplace and the body count of British soldiers was rapidly climbing.

Conditions in the troops’ desert camp were basic: food consisted of boil-in-the-bag ration packs, the “mozzipods” they slept in were cramped, and sand permeated everything.

But for Flt Sgt Barrow, 48, at least there was Buster.

In the book he has written as a tribute to their partnership, he recalls the dog’s greatest triumph: a house raid in which he tracked down suicide vests primed for detonation. Two bomb-makers and two teenage would-be bombers were arrested as a result.

But Buster’s ability to track Taliban insurgents and sniff out bombs were just one aspect of his armoury.

Flt Sgt Barrow recounts how Buster became a diplomatic tool, too: “As we searched and chatted to the locals, we soon had a long train of children in tow – like a canine Pied Piper, Buster drew in his crowd and entertained them,” he writes. “Anyone looking on would have wondered how on earth a spaniel from the UK could do so much for the ‘hearts and minds’ operation.”

He was, moreover, a model of calmness in terrifying situations, taking his handler’s mind off the immediate risks to himself.

“My main concern was always the little fella, because if he had been injured, my role was non-existent,” he says. “As much as I relied on him not to walk us into IEDs, he needed me to feed and water him.”

He was also an invaluable comfort, emotionally, to both his handler and his comrades.

Flt Sgt Barrow writes of one evening after coming under insurgent fire: “I was missing home and [my wife] Tracy but when he settled on my chest, I curled my arms around him. I needed to talk about the bad day at work, and this time Buster was the one listening.”

At times, Flt Sgt Barrow’s tale reads almost like a love story: the separations – when the serviceman flies home on leave and the springer spaniel is quarantined – are poignant, with the spaniel gazing forlornly after his handler as the latter walks away.

Their joint tour of duty in Afghanistan over in 2008, Buster went on to do four more months in Iraq in 2009. Then Buster found a home with Sgt Barrow in Lincoln.

He retired in 2011, aged seven, and a stream of honours followed. He was made the RAF Police’s lifetime mascot – unprecedented for any dog – and he has received more requests for television appearances than many human war heroes.

Flt Sgt Barrow, meanwhile, went on to become head of police at RAF Henlow. Looking back at his tours with Buster, he is phlegmatic about the life-or-death situations he faced.

“I don’t think we see it the same way as civilians do,” he says. “We deal with it, and just get on with things.”

Nor does he talk much about the horrors of war. “You don’t want to dwell on those sorts of things. It could tip you over the edge a bit.”

But whatever hardships life throws at him, Buster remains by his side.

“We made a pact from the start to look after each other, and Buster has stayed true to our bargain,” he writes. “He saved my life every day we were together. I owe him so much that I can never repay the debt, even if we lived for ever.”

‘Buster: The Dog Who Saved a Thousand Lives’ by RAF Police Sergeant Will Barrow and Isabel George, is published by Virgin Books at £9.99. To order a copy, call 0844 871 1514 or visit books.telegraph.co.uk

http://telegraph.feedsportal.com/c/32726/f/646284/s/42f6b2ae/sc/10/l/0L0Stelegraph0O0Clifestyle0Cpets0C113848180CBuster0Esaved0Emy0Elife0Eevery0Eday0Ewe0Ewere0Etogether0Bhtml/story01.htm